Dental FAQ’s

Q: What you should after an accident?

A: Accidents happen, and knowing what to do when one occurs can mean the difference between saving and losing a tooth. Here are some common dental emergencies and how to deal with them. For all dental emergencies, it’s important to visit your dentist as soon as possible. Most dentists reserve time in their daily schedules for emergency patients so be sure to call your dentist and provide as much detail as you can about your condition. If the accident occurs when your dental office is not open, visit your local emergency room.

Q: What do I do if I knock out my tooth?

A: For a knocked-out permanent or adult tooth, keep it moist at all times. If you can, try placing the tooth back in the socket without touching the root. If that’s not possible, place it in between your cheek and gums, in milk, or use a tooth preservation product that has the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Then, get to your dentist’s office right away.

Q: What if I crack my tooth?

A: For a cracked tooth, immediately rinse the mouth with warm water to clean the area. Put cold compresses on the face to keep any swelling down. See your dentist as soon as possible.

Q: If I bite my tongue or lip, how do I treat it?

A: If you bite your tongue or lip, clean the area gently with water and apply a cold compress. See your dentist or go to the emergency room as soon as possible.

Q: How do I treat a toothache?

A: For toothaches, rinse your mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss to remove any food caught between your teeth. Do not put aspirin on your aching tooth or gums; it may burn the gum tissue. If the pain persists, contact your dentist.

Q: What if I think my jaw is broken?

A: If you think your jaw is broken apply cold compresses to control the swelling. Go to your dentist or a hospital emergency department immediately.

Q: How do I remove an object that’s stuck in my mouth or teeth?

A: For objects stuck in the mouth, try to gently remove with floss but do not try to remove it with a sharp or pointed instrument. See your dentist or go to the emergency room as soon as possible.

Q: How can I avoid a dental emergency?

A: There are a number of simple precautions you can take to avoid accident and injury to the teeth:

· Wear a mouth guard when participating in sports or recreational activities.
· Avoid chewing ice, popcorn kernels and hard candy, all of which can crack a tooth.
· Use scissors, NEVER your teeth, to cut things.

Q: When should I take my child to the dentist for the first check-up?

A: In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a dentist when the first tooth appears or no later than his/her first birthday.

Q: Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

A: Primary, or “baby,” teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt.

Q: What should I do if my child has a toothache?

A: In order to prevent dental problems, your child should see a dentist when the first tooth appears or no later than his/her first birthday.

Q: Are thumb sucking and pacifier habits harmful for a child’s teeth?

A:Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers when the permanent teeth arrive, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your dentist.

Q: Toothpaste: when should we begin using it and how much should we use?

A:Fluoridated toothpaste should be introduced when a child is 2-3 years of age. Prior to that, parents should clean the child’s teeth with water and a soft-bristled toothbrush. When toothpaste is used after age 2-3, place only a pea-sized dab of toothpaste on the toothbrush.

Q: How do I make my child’s diet safe for his teeth?

A:Make sure your child has a balanced diet, including one serving each of: fruits and vegetables, breads and cereals, milk and dairy products, and meat, fish, and eggs. Limiting the servings of sugars and starches will also aid in protecting your child’s teeth from decay. You can ask your dentist to help you select foods that will protect your children’s teeth.

Q: How do dental sealants work?

A: Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.

For more information please visit:
http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/dental-emergencies/